A body-based deep relaxation practice


Relaxing the mind through relaxing the body.

This article from Lion’s Roar, an online Buddhist magazine, leads you through a simple three-step meditation process. The practice given is based on Buddha's teaching to not only become aware of our mind, but also the body, “...visiting each part with awareness, acceptance, care, and without judgment.”

This gentle, supportive, exploratory approach to the body is also an integral part of Somatic Experiencing (SE™) and Somatic Touch trauma resolution therapy. Through contacting and simply noticing what is present in our physiology, we begin to heal:

At Bodhisattva Bodywork, I offer a variety of stress reduction and trauma resolution therapeutic services in my Chapel Hill office and online via a secure video link. I’m also affiliated with a trauma-focused group psychotherapy practice in Japan: Trauma Treatment Center and Resources (TTCR), which offers body-based therapy sessions and educational seminars in both English and Japanese.

Fatigue? Mood swings? Memory lapses? Physical aches and pains? It could be dehydration.

I hadn’t realized how used I’d gotten to the pain emanating from both hip joints until a visiting relative asked me, “Why are you walking like that?” My usual morning stiff-legged gait had caught his attention.

X-rays ruled out arthritis. I tried chiropractic and acupuncture, but neither provided long-lasting relief. I wasn’t sleeping well, and was tired and cranky. In desperation, I scheduled an appointment with nutritional health coach, Rachel Khani.

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After completing a very thorough diet, exercise, and lifestyle intake, Rachel suggested a few very simple dietary changes. At the top of the list was her recommendation that I drink at least 70 ounces of water, pure water, every day.

That’s two liters of water a day! I protested, but I was in pain. I did as Rachel recommended. Within two weeks, I was sleeping through the night and my hip pain was GONE. To say I was surprised would be an understatement--I was stunned. I couldn’t believe that simply consuming more water could make such a difference.

After this experience, I now routinely ask clients about their water consumption habits. For more information on why water is so important for our well-being and for some ideas on how to increase your own water consumption, please click here to read Rachel’s post: “Are you depressed….or dehydrated?”


At Bodhisattva Bodywork, I offer a variety of trauma resolution therapeutic services in my Chapel Hill office and online via a secure video link. I’m also affiliated with a trauma-focused group psychotherapy practice in Japan: Trauma Treatment Center and Resources (TTCR), which offers body-based therapy sessions and educational seminars in both English and Japanese.