Fatigue? Mood swings? Memory lapses? Physical aches and pains? It could be dehydration.

I hadn’t realized how used I’d gotten to the pain emanating from both hip joints until a visiting relative asked me, “Why are you walking like that?” My usual morning stiff-legged gait had caught his attention.

X-rays ruled out arthritis. I tried chiropractic and acupuncture, but neither provided long-lasting relief. I wasn’t sleeping well, and was tired and cranky. In desperation, I scheduled an appointment with nutritional health coach, Rachel Khani.

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After completing a very thorough diet, exercise, and lifestyle intake, Rachel suggested a few very simple dietary changes. At the top of the list was her recommendation that I drink at least 70 ounces of water, pure water, every day.

That’s two liters of water a day! I protested, but I was in pain. I did as Rachel recommended. Within two weeks, I was sleeping through the night and my hip pain was GONE. To say I was surprised would be an understatement--I was stunned. I couldn’t believe that simply consuming more water could make such a difference.

After this experience, I now routinely ask clients about their water consumption habits. For more information on why water is so important for our well-being and for some ideas on how to increase your own water consumption, please click here to read Rachel’s post: “Are you depressed….or dehydrated?”


At Bodhisattva Bodywork, I offer a variety of trauma resolution therapeutic services in my Chapel Hill office and online via a secure video link. I’m also affiliated with a trauma-focused group psychotherapy practice in Japan: Trauma Treatment Center and Resources (TTCR), which offers body-based therapy sessions and educational seminars in both English and Japanese.

"Children's Cafeterias" provide many types of nourishment

**In translating a post by one of my Japanese colleagues, I learned about the concept of “Kodomo Shokudou” or “Children’s Cafeterias.” I thought some of you might also be interested, particularly as we enter the season of giving.

“Good evening. It's clinical psychologist Shoichi Akimoto from the Trauma Treatment Center and Resources. This afternoon, I attended a forum on “Kodomo Shokudou,” pictured below:

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Kodomo Shokodo Forum.jpg


(Translation note: Kodomo Shokudou, or “Children's Cafeterias,” began in 2012 as a grassroots effort to provide warm, nutritious meals and dining companionship to disadvantaged children. This article in the Japan Times gives a brief history.

“I learned quite a few things during the forum, but was particularly struck by the fact that, while these Cafeterias are created for children, they are also becoming places where parents and neighbors gather and interact.

There are Children's Cafeterias that host a Christmas party on behalf of busy parents--children may attend and the parents can then join in after they've finished work. This helps the families form relationships with their neighbors. I think it would be great if this concept became more widespread.

Also, because the children have set times where neighborhood association members come to feed them or help them with their studies, the children learn that there are adults who want to spend time with them and who honor and treasure those time commitments.

As I listened, I was nodding in agreement. This is about attachment, isn't it? Attachment trauma can always be repaired. Research into brain plasticity is continuing, and I think proof of this is coming in the near future.

But this (whether we call it a “challenge” or a “risky venture”) can be a challenge for the adult caregivers themselves. Various unconscious emotions can surface as they interact with the children. Whether or not these adults are acknowledging and learning from this could result in greatly divergent outcomes.

At our Center, we also offer counseling for caregivers. As you address your own challenges, your activities will become so much more enjoyable!

We've opened a trauma-focused counseling center in Saitama City, Japan, called TTCR: Trauma Treatment Center and Resources: https://saitama-traumahealingenglish.jimdofree.com. We also offer lectures on trauma for groups and businesses—please enquire!”


At Bodhisattva Bodywork, I offer a variety of trauma resolution therapeutic services in my Chapel Hill office and online via a secure video link. I’m also affiliated with a trauma-focused group psychotherapy practice in Japan: Trauma Treatment Center and Resources (TTCR), which offers body-based therapy sessions and educational seminars in both English and Japanese.